.

UPDATE: PTA Rallies for Proposition 38 in Santa Monica

The measure's supporters say $10 million is at stake in the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District.

Updated at 11 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24

Passage of Proposition 38 "would be a great thing'' for schools in the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District, the president of the Santa Monica-Malibu PTA Council said.

Supporters say the income tax increase on the November ballot would bring more than $10 million to district schools in the 2013-2014 school year and more than $24 million in the 2023-24 school year.

"Proposition 38 is a visionary and transformative solution,'' Patti Braun said at a rally at Clover Park. "We want a brand new funding stream that will guarantee every school will get what it needs and prohibit Sacramento from touching the money.''

Proposition 38 would increase personal income tax rates for 12 years for annual earnings over $7,316 using a sliding scale from 0.4 percent for the lowest individual earners to 2.2 percent for individuals earning more than $2.5 million.

During the first four years, 60 percent of revenues would go to schools from kindergarten through 12th grade, 30 percent to repaying state debt and 10 percent to early childhood programs. Thereafter, 85 percent of revenues would go to schools from kindergarten through 12th grade and 15 percent to early childhood programs.

The increase would be roughly $5 billion in the 2012-13 fiscal year, $10 billion in the 2013-2014 fiscal year and tending to increase over time, according to an estimate from the Legislative Analyst's Office and Director of Finance Ana J. Matosantos.

Opponents of Proposition 38 call it a "flawed, costly and misleading initiative'' that would hurt small businesses, as many small business owners pay personal income taxes rather than corporate taxes. The rival measure backed by Gov. Jerry Brown, Proposition 30, would increase the sales tax by a quarter-cent on the dollar for four years and raise the income tax on annual earnings over $250,000 for seven years.

The increased revenues would result in an increase to the minimum guarantee for schools and community colleges under terms of Proposition 98, approved by voters in 1988. Revenue generated by Proposition 30 would be deposited into a newly created state account, the Education Protection Account.

Of the funds in the account, 89 percent would be devoted to schools from kindergarten through 12th grade and the other 11 percent to community colleges. Each school district would receive at least $200 per student in funds from the account and each community college district at least $100 per full-time student.

The measure also would guarantee funding for public safety services realigned from state to local governments. Proposition 30 would generate an additional $6 billion in state tax revenues from the 2012-2013 through 2016-17 fiscal years, according to an estimate from the state's Legislative Analyst's Office and Matosantos. Smaller amounts would be generated in the 2017-18 and 2018-19 fiscal years. Brown has called Proposition 30 "modest, fair and temporary.''

Opponents of Proposition 30 say its passage would hurt small business and job creation, and the Legislature should first enact meaningful changes to the public employee pension systems and cut wasteful spending before raising taxes.

If both measures are approved by voters, the one getting the most yes votes will prevail.

Christina Cox October 24, 2012 at 06:59 PM
Just to keep it in perspective - Prop 30 is problematic but the new tax is only on earnings OVER $250,000. If you make less than $250,000/year you will not be affected. If you make $250,000 or more a year you will have a very small temporary tax on any earnings OVER $250,000 (not including the first $250,000 which aren't taxed). Also, Prop 30 will stop the cuts THIS year while Prop 38 doesn't start till next year. If Prop 30 fails, elementary & high schools could reduce the school year by 3 weeks this year. THREE WEEKS. Also, the UC and Cal State schools will lose a minimum of $250 million. So, while Prop 30 is problematic, nowhere near perfect etc. and it does worry me that it doesn't include early childhood education (unless I missed something?) and while my usual default vote to Propositions is NO, I urge you to think about this year. As a former 6th grade math/science teacher who worked for LAUSD, I can tell you, cutting funding is not an option. Even when funding wasn't cut I didn't have enough chairs/desks for my students and when I had enough chairs, some were broken. My heat didn't always work, the cleaning staff were so short on workers that my floors were mopped 3x in 2010 (the last year I worked.) My students swept every afternoon since nobody else did and we couldn't live in the filth. We teachers were laid off for 3 years in a row. Sometimes we were hired back at a different school in a different grade about 2 weeks before school started. Whew! Now I'm rambling.
Christina Cox October 24, 2012 at 07:00 PM
Here is the EdSource graphic that compares Props 30 & 38 side by side in case you missed it: http://www.edsource.org/infographic-initiatives.html
Malibu Magoo October 24, 2012 at 08:04 PM
Just a question, not a position... isn't it the legislature and the governor himself who choose to cut a particular department or program when they present a budget?
patti braun October 24, 2012 at 08:31 PM
Please join us at the Rally for Education today at Clover Park at 4pm. There will be interesting speakers, free food, and a great photo op. Let's show our Santa Monica and Malibu communities that we think it's time to invest in our schools!!!
Malibu Magoo October 24, 2012 at 10:22 PM
Never mind, I found the answer to my own question (above)...
Gregory Brittain October 30, 2012 at 08:56 PM
“Adjusted for inflation, California’s government spending increased 42 percent per capita from 2000 to 2010.” http://www.foxandhoundsdaily.com/2012/10/reason-rupe-poll-california-voters-moving-towards-wisconsin-like-government-reforms/ Reduce per capita inflation adjusted spending to 2000 levels and there will be plenty of money. There would probably be enough to return money to the taxpayers.
Gregory Brittain October 30, 2012 at 08:57 PM
if the politicians in Sacramento have ~$3 Billion to squander on HSR, they do not need or deserve more of our money. HSR represents ~ 1/2 of the money they say Prop 30 will raise. The HSR train from nowhere to nowhere is the easiest budget savings ever.
Gregory Brittain October 30, 2012 at 09:00 PM
Please see Fran Tarkenton, What if the NFL Played by Teachers' Rules? http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204226204576601232986845102.html If every football player was paid based on seniority and could not be cut from the team absent very serious misconduct, what would happen to the quality of the game? More generally, government employees keep their jobs and get raises regardless of how hard they work and what they individually or their agencies, departments, schools or districts accomplish. It is practically impossible to fire a government employee for doing a lousy job, never mind merely mediocre. In the private sector, we have to produce goods or services that other people will voluntarily purchase. At least with education, there is a perverse incentive. When the government schools do a lousy job, the Dems, education system and GEUs can say our kids need a good education so the government needs to spend more money on the (lousy) government schools. Without accusing them of trying to provide lousy education, people and systems respond to financial incentives. There is certainly no financial incentive for any teacher or employee of the government schools, or for the government run school system to do a good job.
Gregory Brittain October 30, 2012 at 09:00 PM
(http://californiabudgetbites.org/2011/01/ says not increasing taxes will require cutting $930 per student [out of $11,405 per student. http://www.lao.ca.gov/reports/2011/calfacts/calfacts_010511.aspx (p.13)]. That is 8.15%. Not the end of the world. Families and businesses base their spending on the money available and prioritize accordingly. How many families and businesses have and to reduce their spending by 8% or more?
Gregory Brittain October 30, 2012 at 09:02 PM
Let’s imagine that in order to assure everyone gets food, the government will collect taxes and provide free food to everyone. However, to get your free government provided food, you must go to the government grocery store nearest to where you live. We will unionize the employees of the government food industry. After three years, the employees get tenure and absent serious misconduct, it is practically impossible to fire any employee of the government food system. Furthermore, all employees of the government food system will be paid based on sonority regardless of how hard they work or what they accomplish. In addition, the unions of employees of the government food system will take money involuntarily from all employees of the government food system to use to help elect politicians friendly to the government food system unions, which politicians will give raises and unaffordable pension benefits to the employees of the government food system. The employees of the government food system will all get raise each year regardless of the quality of food and service provided by the government food system. I have a tough question for all Dems, Libs and GEU members, What would happen to the quality and cost of the food and service in the government food system compared to the current system of food provided by private businesses? Anyone who questioned this system, would be accused being against people and especially children having food.
Ddez November 04, 2012 at 06:54 AM
About Gregory I am a member of the Redlands Tea Party Patriots.
Ddez November 04, 2012 at 06:55 AM
About Gregory I am a member of the Redlands Tea Party Patriots.
Ddez November 04, 2012 at 06:55 AM
About Gregory I am a member of the Redlands Tea Party Patriots.
Ddez November 04, 2012 at 06:55 AM
About Gregory I am a member of the Redlands Tea Party Patriots.
Ddez November 04, 2012 at 07:04 AM
About Gregory I am a member of the Redlands Tea Party Patriots.
Christina Cox November 05, 2012 at 11:40 AM
You've obviously not been in a classroom (especially in LAUSD) lately. I usually had 35+ kids in my classroom with about 25 working chairs/desks. The school was so crowded we had to go year round which doesn't sound like much until you have to move classrooms 2-3x per year. Which means you don't set it up as well since you know you'll have to take it right down. The overcrowding means kids don't get the attention they need, means they are fighting for resources. Our "PE" consisted of 65 kids per teacher. The spent 1/3 of the class on the hot asphalt waiting for the teacher to finish taking attendance. The only equipment I saw were some basketballs. Not that many basketballs. During the standardized testing, the short snack & lunch breaks were spent in massive lines to get low quality junk food. My classroom was a good city block away from the cafeteria so most times my students got in line so late they missed lunch entirely. If I let them out 2 minutes early in hopes they could make it I was reprimanded (as were they) by the deans. I was laid off 3 years in a row. Sometimes I was informed that I got my job back 2 weeks before school started. Many of my colleagues were informed they were now teaching a completely different grade/subject matter with only 2 weeks to prepare. Please go visit a classroom and see if they can afford an 8% cut.

Boards

More »
Got a question? Something on your mind? Talk to your community, directly.
Note Article
Just a short thought to get the word out quickly about anything in your neighborhood.
Share something with your neighbors.What's on your mind?What's on your mind?Make an announcement, speak your mind, or sell somethingPost something
See more »